You Do Not Have to Suffer

The spirit of this post is simple: You do not have to suffer. You really don’t. It doesn’t matter how long you have suffered or what your reasons are for suffering. If you’re reading this, you can be free of suffering.

Even more beautifully, we can recognize that underneath all of our conditioning, we simply do not suffer. Beneath the many layers of what we’ve picked up in this world—much of it being complete madness—we don’t suffer at all. What you truly are is not a thing that suffers, nor does it try not to suffer. What you are is not a thing that is ensnared by the external world and/or the conditioned mind, nor does it strive to be un-ensnared. It simply is free of all conditions and limits, and there’s nothing you have to do to make this true.

It isn’t even accurate to give it the label of “freedom,” because in the realm of pure consciousness, we lose both our need and desire for words. Descriptors fail us at these heights, and at times it even feels like we literally cannot speak. Words are necessarily used in the realm of concepts, ideas, and other mental constructs.

But pure consciousness is not a mental construct, and this is precisely why we fail and disagree upon trying to define it. Pure consciousness is what’s left when all mental constructs fall away. That means the more we theorize about it, the further we get from understanding it. When we do this, we’re just stringing more constructs together when really we should be aiming to take them all down. Seeking answers within the mind is like being on a treadmill and believing you’re running to paradise.

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Each of us must experience the reality of basic awareness for ourselves, and at times, we all do. It’s just that the mind tends to rush back and cover this experience up, and then it’s back to business as usual. After living this way for so long, we have slipped into the belief that “normal consciousness” is one that’s thought-ridden, habit-ridden, small, personal, and separate. This belief in personal separation is fertile for further beliefs, many of which create great suffering: Feelings of superiority and inferiority—and thus hierarchies of all kinds—cannot sprout without this belief in the small, personal self.

Our belief in what is the “normal” state of consciousness is quite backwards: Pure consciousness (what we are, not what we “have”) is expansive, knowing, aware, nonjudgmental, and constantly fresh. This is actually our natural state, and it can’t really be separated from anything. Of course consciousness exists in our minds and egos, but these represent a contracted, limited version of it. Going permanently beyond (or beneath, if you prefer) these things results in total liberation.

In this space, wisdom flows naturally and life comes very easily. Here we are able to look at suffering and smile at its smallness and ultimate nonexistence. After we see, confusion and frustration sometimes arise when we try to explain the inexplicable, or when we expect others to see what we have seen. If we are committed to remaining as our true selves, we make an effort to use this frustration as a practice for patience and humility.

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When imagined by the conditioned mind, this “absence of suffering” isn’t terribly exciting. Even using descriptors such as “clear,” “fresh,” and “awake” often don’t appeal to us enough to really look. Voluntarily sitting quietly with no distractions is nobody’s idea of a good time. If your feeling towards the spiritual path is that it is tranquil though dull, you aren’t alone, but this couldn’t be further from the truth: Knowing consciousness is not dreamy and tranquil; it is wide awake and alert. It is a state of perpetual surprise.

Picturing this kind of freedom as “boring” (as compared to the excitement of our personal dramas, plans, and drug-induced states) is one of the mind’s favorite tricks. And as long as the mind can use the concept of boredom to put us off from seeking, it will.

Whenever I get this mistaken feeling of “boredom,” I try to sit with it. In this way, we can see through boredom’s illusory nature. Life cannot ever be boring if our eyes are new every moment, and they are.

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When it comes to suffering and its release, we aren’t just talking about acute despair. Regret, guilt, shame, painful rumination, jealousy, worry, fear of the future, background irritation, longstanding resentment, insecurity, bitterness, anxiety, depression, boredom, all of those times we just “feel off…” all of these and more fall under the umbrella of “suffering.” When these things are pulled from their common root of belief in separate personhood, we know an entirely new mode of living:

This is a state of total awareness of the world without becoming caught up in the world. It is engagement with others without being sucked into their stories and/or taking on their various energies. It is the joy of sitting in stillness. It is experiencing senses that are actually sharper without the roar of constant mental chatter. It’s seeing, unobstructed by judgment. It’s being home and feeling pretty much the same everywhere you go. It’s in this way that we lose the urge to constantly chase experiences in the mistaken belief that there’s “something more” for us in “some other place.”

Abiding in this state represents a revolution of the human mind and psyche. This is the revolution required for humanity to survive and help our planet heal. At this stage in our evolutionary journey, revolution is no longer about which person is “in charge,” or even trying to enforce a way of governance that we think will be “good for everyone” (you know what they say about the road to Hell.). It is about seeing the Truth and moving naturally from this place. There is no move towards sanity that can be made without first seeing this.

We will either experience such a revolution, or we will die out due to our own unconsciousness. Neither the Earth, the Universe, or God will reach in and prevent this from happening. Clinging to fantasies of a “future prophet” or a literal “second coming of Jesus the person” is actually the opposite of truly knowing God.

We must do it on our own. As humans, we were each granted the capacity to see the Truth. We can see this, and if we do, we will know a boundless and blissful consciousness.

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If this is all true—and I maintain that it is—the question quickly becomes Why, then? If we don’t have to suffer, why do we?

There are several answers for this, but digging too far into them would detract from the simplicity of this message: None of us have to suffer. Half of me wants to say “it’s not easy,” and yet something deeper knows that it actually is the easiest thing you will ever do.

To your mind, seeing the Truth is hard work. But to your true self, nothing is more natural.

– Lish