Christ Was a Radical Revolutionary

The beginning of this post is probably going to read like an advertisement for Spoke’n Hostel in Mitchell, Oregon. That’s because it is legitimately one of the most beautiful places I have ever been. It is also run by two of the kindest, most Christ-like individuals I have ever met.

Their names are Pat and Jalet Farrell. They had a vision for Spoke’n, and execute it to a tee. The hostel caters largely to cyclists riding through on the Transamerica cycling route, which runs right through Mitchell. Travelers who are out on vacation looking to fish, camp, or hike also come here. Most of them are blown away by what has been done with the space.

The hostel is also a church. Upstairs, the pews have been re-purposed as benches (I’m writing this post on one of them now), and the pulpit has two cozy chairs on it. On Sundays, there is a church service in the basement where Pat is the pastor. What I like about him is that he has a deep understanding of the message of Christ, and consistently brings his sermons back to that message. He and Jalet have experienced the peace of God in a way that has transcended a mental position. They have allowed God to work over their whole lives because they know this peace.

And on that spiritual level, I love the hostel because it takes all the best things about spirituality—generosity, hospitality, connection, community—and puts them into practice beyond a Sunday service. No one is excluded. These principles are made manifest right before our eyes, and the energy here is truly beautiful.

It can be so common to talk the talk, spiritually speaking. Perhaps we know our mantras and chants; we say our prayers; we sit down to meditate. But how often do we create something that actualizes our values so fully? And are we able to remain as open hands with our awareness of Truth, or do we feel the need to constantly be “telling” people about it, even if they are not interested?

This brings me back to that word: Christ-like. What does it mean?

Obviously it means to emulate the traits Christ Himself embodied. Somehow, we’ve gotten confused about what exactly those traits might be. This is because each human filters the parables and behaviors of Christ through their existing egoic minds. Everything is colored by what the state of mind is able to comprehend. One who wears yellow-tinted sunglasses all their life will never see the true blue of the sky.

A less egoic mind will see Christ/God more closely to his divine nature: Open for All and unconditionally loving. A highly egoic mind will place many more conditions on what God requires to achieve salvation.

Jesus Christ was indeed a realized being—God manifested as human. He was surely not recognized as such by everyone, hence the crucifixion. Similarly, the Buddha announced that he had attained complete inner freedom, but the first person he told this to regarded him with skepticism and walked away.

In general, the egoic mind prefers beliefs over Truth, and resists that which violates the beliefs it has affixed itself to.

I offer this: Christ was a radical revolutionary, and if his teachings were digested and made real by his followers, we would be creating a vastly more beautiful world. His love was of such power, it is still incomprehensible and misunderstood by many minds—even those who self-describe as Christians.

Christ took no half-measures. He made Himself visible, had courage, was God-realized and proclaimed it in a hostile environment. Upon enlightenment, He was moved to make an example out of his own life. He did this so that others could see how utterly loved (and truly in love) they are; how unimportant the external world is in comparison to what lies inside. As He said: “Neither shall they say ‘look here,’ or ‘look there.’ The kingdom of God is within.”

That is ultimately what the path guides us to: A commitment to a life rooted in the heart, even when it is unpopular. We listen to what is inside even when it pisses everyone off and confuses them—family and friends included. We listen to what is inside even when it isn’t coming through totally clear. When we are misunderstood, mislabeled, judged, and limited (as we surely will be if we are walking the path sincerely), we keep walking.

I’m sure we have all known people who are Christ-like, yet they may not call themselves Christians. So, too, we know Christians who are not particularly Christ-like.

This is the difference that consciousness makes.

What I am saying here about the path is different from the pacifying notion of simply “being a good person.”

First of all, the phrase means nothing until we thoroughly examine what “good” means and even what “person” means. All that is an intellectual minefield. The egoic mind cannot effectively navigate intellectual matters (or anything, really), because it is so preoccupied with preserving itself and its existing positions.

This whole “just be a good person” thing tends to be the weak maxim the mind reaches when it no longer wants to seek. The egoic mind likes to pat itself on the back for being however it already is. It puts no effort into experiencing deeper love and freedom. This is because in order to experience love and freedom, we usually have to change and let go of things the egoic mind doesn’t want to give up. Make no mistake: The egoic mind has no interest in You becoming free of it. Only God wants that for you.

So, it placates us for our current ways: “Just be a good person,” it says, “and everything will be all right.” Of course, the ego-identity usually fancies itself already a good person, with just a little bit of improvement to get started on… someday, of course.

Not now, but maybe tomorrow, maybe next week. Just not now.

Location: Mitchell, OR

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